Thursday, June 4, 2020

Logistics Infrastructure Challenges Coursework Assignment - 825 Words

Logistics Infrastructure Challenges Coursework Assignment (Coursework Sample) Content: Logistics Infrastructure ChallengesName:Institution:Logistics Infrastructure ChallengesThe United States has many urbanized metropolises and upcoming terminals and centers that are also the administrative and economic hubs of most States in the US (OConnor, 2010, p. 134). Similarly, the towns and cities are arguably characterized by their uniqueness in resource endowment, broad range of developmental challenges and long history of survival. In fact, infrastructural construction, and maintenance was for many decades a challenge in the US (OConnor, 2010, p. 138). Currently, this vital sector is in a dilapidated state, not to mention the need for sustainable improvements in terms of repair and installation of new systems in a steadily growing population and urbanization.The infrastructural landscape of the country that is cross-cutting in all the states is underscored by the old and inadequate surface transportation structures (OConnor, 2010, p. 139). As a result, highwa y congestion, jams, and related opportunity and time losses have been common in the US for the past periods of economic slump. Besides, the rampant road carnages coupled with exorbitant fuel taxes and high pump prices has made the management and construction of efficient and durable infrastructure in the US a necessity. The multiple agencies with no central coordination and bureaucratic regulatory policies and laws have proven a hurdle to the rapid advancement of the sector (Porter, Rivkin, 2012, p. 55). Similarly, the inadequate political will across the country in the past Administrations have not been able to enact proactive plans and formulate such policies for the improvement of US critical Infrastructure. Moreover, ever increasing population in the US has proved to be overstretching the limited government budget further causing the transport and communication menace occasionally experienced in the US.Proposal assumptionsThe assumptions to be made in the project plan for a mul ti-sectorial improvement of the logistical infrastructure is that the government is the sole entity entrusted with planning, implementing, monitoring and evaluating public land resources and surface infrastructural reserves and developments. Additionally, the executive state organ in conjunction with its affiliate local authorities, can lease, rent, contract or tender private corporations to construct, run, or assess the public utilities on its behalf (Porter, Rivkin, 2012, p. 65).Practical solutionsFor the possible achievement of proactive solutions in the transport, communication and other critical infrastructural developments in the US, the Federal Government must introduce relevant and effective reforms. These include guideline initiation, dispensation, developmental design, functioning, constant assessment and the sustainable innovations and supervision of the critical infrastructure. Notably, the US has hundreds of corporations that oversee the logistics in infrastructural d evelopment with no distinct or supreme authority responsible for this endeavor (Edwards, Snyder, 2009, p. 21). Therefore, a central coordinating agency should be formed to reduce the financial and time resources, duplication of roles, possible contradictions, and harmonization of regulation, ideologies and decision making in the sector. Cost effectiveness can also be realized in the required repairs, routine maintenance, application and integration of cheap renewable technology and innovations through seamless consultations within and across the responsible agencies (Edwards, Snyder, 2009, p. 24).Besides, the government should limit direct involvement in the production of logistical services to allow for a free market especially in the private infrastructural investments, new innovations, and decentralization of the provision of viable practices. This move will channel more resources from the Federal budgetary allocation to help improve the infrastructural, social utility sector a nd to counter the overwhelming population bulge. For example, abolition of selected subsidy that discourages fair competition and incorporation of user friendly fees and incentives as well as outsourcing of cheaper alternative funding can be very effective.Additionally, the US infrastructural departments should upgrade and introduce service delivery strategies that aims at the management of the constant congestion in the transport and communication industries. The populace should be educated on the diverse ways they could lessen overcrowding and traffic hold-ups (Okon, Elhag, 2012, p. 76). Some approaches worth adopting are telework programs or telecommuting, express bus services and improvement of local road connectivity. Similarly, the charging of private vehicles for accessing high occupancy lanes and the collective transportation planning are also necessary. These tactics will discourage unnecessary use of personal cars and encourage city dwellers to opt for bicycles and motorc ycles when going to work or school (Okon, Elhag, 2012, p. 79).A chart showing the nation's deteriorating infrastructure and percentage of serviceable verses unserviceable infrastructureServiceable infrastructure Unserviceable infrastructur...

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Women on the Edge of Time and Stranger in a Strange Land...

The novel Women on the Edge of Time and Stranger in a Strange Land have some similarities. They both depict how the gender socialization process is bias and a catalyst to gender disparity in the society. Both stories bring to light how men are given privileged as compared to women in the society. Analyzing the two stories and using outside sources I will draw a conclusion on how gender and power ideologies have equality impacted our society. â€Å"Women on the Edge of Time† is a book written by Marge Piercy explaining the position of women in the era 1976 going 150 years backwards. This book is open to any kind of interpretation. The narrative shows us the life of a single parent, Chicano. She is a poor woman who is struggling to provide a†¦show more content†¦They excused themselves that they were doing her a favor as they were protecting her from herself. Her mystery leaves us to ask ourselves whether it was really her who was mad or was it the world she was living in? She was just a woman who was suffering her own fate while every other woman was enjoying the life of being provided for by their husbands. ‘She was a woman on the edge; the periphery, the ultimate other, the bottom edge of society, the edge of sanity’. She was a result of abuse from men and science. She had a child who was a fruit of rape. She lost her fertility to a science experiment. She had only two men who had treated her with dignity; her first husband who was killed in the streets by the police and her other husband who died of hepatitis, Claude. The institution that victimized her was the same that took away her protectors, anyone who cared for her. Then, there was Luciente who helped her to jump over to another kind of life. Her presence on the edge made it easier for Luciente to contact her. Luciente was the person from the other side of life (future). He was some kind of a hallucination but this did not make it less hopeful. Whether she invented it or not, it was a sign that she had a greater mental state. She had bigger dreams and this contradicted her lack of education and imagination. Piercy skills as a writer give us suspense whether Luciente was a future Connie. Just as Women on the Edge of TimeShow MoreRelatedEssay : Chapter 1756 Words   |  4 PagesBlood dripped from the razor-sharp edge of my ax, Sylke. The strongest opponent I had ever faced kneeled before me, defeated by my unrelenting attack. I could barely hold my weapon, both arms covered in numerous wounds. The air steamed as I panted for breath, each exhale like a small gale. It was finally time. â€Å"Where is She?† I spoke slowly, calmly, despite my grievous injuries. My foe grimaced, releasing the hold on her greatsword, slowly leaning backward, until she was flat on the ground, oneRead MoreEssay on Sex in Ursula K. LeGuins The Left Hand of Darkness1287 Words   |  6 Pagesto a strange planet called Gethen, or Winter. His mission there is to persuade the nations of Gethen to join an alliance Genly Ai represents called the â€Å"Ekumen†. However, his journey is rather difficult due to the great difference in societies from Genly Ai’s home planet, Earth, and this new one. In Gethen, he learns that the people are completely unsexed for the majority of their days. When they are sexed, it is only for a few days and each person is either male or female during this time. The differentRead More Feminists vs. Playboy Playmates Essay2641 Words   |  11 Pagesvs. Playboy Playmates Naked women have been in the front of feminists minds for several decades. Especially when they are pictured in soft-pornography magazine Playboy. Feminists for years have been yelling that Playboy is harmful to both men and women. Males around the country have countered that there is nothing wrong with their Playboy, it is merely a harmless vice. 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She is addicted to his body but she has never treated him as a husband. She never forgot thatRead MoreEssay Self-Discovery in Oates Naked3597 Words   |  15 Pagesstolid, college administrator, prides herself on her liberal views and anti-racist, fair mindedness. Curiously, she remains unnamed throughout the story, though not without reason. Her namelessness brings us closer to her inner world while at the same time obliquely suggesting that, given these same violent circumstances, she could be anyone, even you or me. Names represent a kind of social identity, and Oates main interest here is in exploring what might happen when her characters social frameworkRead More4 Voyages Of Christopher Columbus3767 Words   |  16 Pagesbefore the others, are condemned to pursue that light despite the perception of others. There was a time when the new world did not exist, and the sun set in the west where no man dare to have dreamt to venture to. Beyond that, was considered to be infinity, and of possibilities. One man who never believed in the superstition at the time, starting with the world is flat and an evil presence guard the edge of the world. Christopher Columbus was never deterred on what to or not to be afraid of; and wantedRead MoreFeminism in The Wizard of Oz4177 Words   |  17 Pagestelevision and becoming a part of American cultural history. The song Somewhere Over the Rainbow, won an Oscar for best song, and has been recorded by hundreds of artists. In fact, for numerous critics, the movie is ranked among the top 10 movies of all times, and the Library of Congress names it the most watched film in history (The Wizard of Oz, 2010; Baum, 1956). Most people are more familiar with the movie rather than the series of Baums books. As a film, we must remember that color cinematography

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Jane eyre 3 Essay Example For Students

Jane eyre 3 Essay Jane EyreIn Jane Eyre, the themes of servitude and liberty are brought to life and contrasted with each other in many instances throughout the novel. Inside, Jane at first desires to be a free spirit, but the social class stratification and conditions of the world that she lives in make this dream impossible to truly fulfill. Jane regards the concept of such absolute freedom a fleeting, ethereal, and hollow notion, and accepts her servitude; it is a vehicle that helps her learn more about herself and her true desires. From her experiences in servitude, Jane learns what she needs in a relationship and also what she cannot bear; she recognizes the foolishness of class distinctions and realizes the true value of kindliness and being able to forgive and forget. Jane seems to be consistently moving from one type of servitude to another throughout the novel, from her beginnings at Gateshead under Mrs. Reed and Mr. Brocklehurst at Lowood Academy, to Rochester at Thornfield, and then to St. John at Moor House. She Jane ultimately realizes that attaining true liberty is not only beyond her power, but it is also not really her true desire. She rejects the idea of seeking spiritual liberty alone and accepting a life of solitude like St. John, and chooses instead to remain in a type of servitude as Rochesters wife. However, she consoles herself with the fact that this is a different type of servitude unlike her others, it is that of a lover caring for another, someone who needs and appreciates her, and someone who treats her with respect. These are the things that she has wanted all of her life, and she is willing to put aside her personal freedom to enjoy them and to for once be loved, accepted, and appreciated. Throughout the book Jane serves many different masters, and her situation, thoughts, and desires change greatly as she develops, as do her feelings concerning freedom and servitude. The first of her masters is the Reed family, most notably John and Mrs. Reed. These opening characters serve to represent a transformation in her character, as she goes from obedient and unassertive to very opinionated and defiant. While Jane at first obeys their orders because she wants to be included in their social circle, she soon realizes that the Reeds are nothing more than arrogant, elitist slave drivers, and that her submission only serves to reaffirm their power. Her first act of rebellion is against John, who condemns her for reading his books, and reminds her that she is not an equal, but a beggar, not worthy of living with gentlemens children.(27) . After he strikes her with the book, she struggles against him and cries out, You are like a murderer you are like a slave-driver you are like th e Roman emperors!(43). Here she is stating that his rights are not natural at all; he has gained them by oppressing others with his bullying force. In her comparison of John to a tyrant, she threatens his class identity by implying that his authority and power are completely illegitimate. Here, Jane begins to realize the unjust cruelty in the treatment she receives, and refuses to continue being the abused prop to the Reeds need to reaffirm their power. This is the type of servitude that becomes unpalatable to Jane; she will not stand for a servitude in which she is unappreciated, abused, and outcast as an inferior. She takes it upon herself to no longer let the Reeds reject her, but rather herself reject the Reeds, and all that they stand for. Later, when Mrs. Reed tells Mr. Brocklehurst that Jane is a liar, Jane again rebels against her aunts underhanded move and delivers an impassioned speech, in which she openly rejects Mrs. Reed and states: You think I have no feelings, and tha t I cannot do without one bit of love or kindness; but I cannot live so†¦People think you are a good woman, but you are bad, hard-hearted. You are deceitful!(45-46). Here, Jane makes clear what she needs as a human being and what she will not tolerate from the Reeds; she needs to be loved, and to be acknowledged as a real person with real feelings. She will not stand for obedient servitude under these conditions, and for the first time is explicit and direct in her open rejection of Mrs. Reed. Jane is then sent to Lowood, where she is again made an outcast by Mr. Brocklehurst, who one day declares that she is a liar and that no one should speak to her for the rest of the day. Brocklehurst is like the Reeds in his assumption of natural rights, the power of the elite social class, and his attempts to make Jane feel outcast and unwelcome. Lowood, rather than being a vehicle for young, impoverished students to learn and to rise out of their social class, is more like a tool that Br ocklehurst uses to reaffirm social class divisions and superiority. The school is surrounded by walls so high as to exclude every glimpse of prospect,(80) a visual description that alludes to Janes feeling of entrapment in this school. Here, life is regulated by a strict discipline and lifestyle, and it is enforced harshly by authoritarian figures such as Mr. Brocklehurst and Miss Scatcherd. It is here that Jane comes to an important realization, as she states, My eye passed all objects to rest on those most remote,†¦all within their boundary of rock seemed prison-ground, exile limits. I traced the white road†¦vanishing in gorge between the two: how I longed to follow it further!†¦I tired of the routine of eight years in one afternoon. I desired for liberty; for liberty I gasped; for liberty I uttered a prayer; it seemed faintly scattered on the wind then blowing. I abandoned it and framed a humbler supplication; for a change, stimulus: that petition, too, seemed swep t off into vague space; Then, I cried, half desperate, grant me at least a new servitude! (99)Jane shows in this passage that she wants to escape the boring routine of Lowood, and she faces this with excitement and no fear. However, her prayer for true liberty seems faintly scattered on the wind; she abandons it because it is a dream that she feels cannot ever be fully realized in the world and society that she lives in. She instead turns to the idea of at least a change, which she abandons again, turning to the idea of at least a new form of servitude. To Jane, a new servitude is the only realistic and achievable goal within reach, because it does not sound too sweet; it is not like such words as Liberty, Excitement, Enjoyment: delightful sounds truly; but no more than sounds for me; and so hollow and fleeting that it is a mere waste of time to listen to them.(100). Jane abandons the ideas of Liberty, Excitement, Enjoyment because they are not real to her, they are no more than hol low and fleeting sounds that she considers a waste of time. She realizes that they are ideals which are not realistically attainable, and actually accepts servitude, just as long as it is somewhere else. Discuss the perception that financial accounting is transforming EssayTrue liberty is never really a feasible option for Jane in this novel. Jane obtains absolute liberty, in its purest form, when she leaves Thornfield and struggles to survive in nature; in this scenario, total freedom ends in total desolation. Though Jane would ideally like to be completely free, she realizes that the sounds of such words as Liberty, Excitement, and Enjoyment are hollow and have no meaning for her. The cold, harsh world and society that she lives in prevents these things from ever really being attainable to her. She acknowledges this fact, and accepts servitude as her destiny in life, not as an inferior slave being but as a recognized individual with a real use and service to someone in need. What Jane desires most is a sense of purpose; of appreciation, care and love, which she fulfills when she finally ends up with Rochester, her soul mate.

Sunday, April 19, 2020

Mimesis Plato and Aristotle Essay Example

Mimesis: Plato and Aristotle Essay The term ‘mimesis’ is loosely defined as ‘imitation’, and although an extensive paper could be written about the cogency of such a narrow definition, I will instead focus on Plato and Aristotle’s contrasting judgements of mimesis (imitation). I will spend one section discussing Plato’s ideas on mimesis and how they relate to his philosophy of reality and the forms. I will then spend a section examining Aristotle’s differing views on mimesis and how it relates to catharsis. During this deliberation I will prove that as with much of their philosophies, Plato and Aristotle disagree on the concept of mimesis. Plato saw mimesis as deceitful and dangerous; Aristotle saw it as cleansing and educational. In book X of The Republic, Plato uses Socrates and Glaucon as artifacts for contemplating the idea of mimesis. In the dialogue, Plato makes it apparent right from the beginning that he has negative predispositions on imitative poetry. Plato writes: â€Å" poetry not admitting at all any part of it that is imitative. For that the imitative must not be admitted looks even more manifest now that the soul’s forms have each been separated out All such things seem to maim the thought of those who hear them and do not as a remedy have the knowledge of how they really are. † This seems to suggest that under Plato’s perfect society, imitative poetry should not be allowed because it is tricking people into believing that these imitations are distracting people from the real truth, the truth that lies in the forms. We will write a custom essay sample on Mimesis: Plato and Aristotle specifically for you for only $16.38 $13.9/page Order now We will write a custom essay sample on Mimesis: Plato and Aristotle specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer We will write a custom essay sample on Mimesis: Plato and Aristotle specifically for you FOR ONLY $16.38 $13.9/page Hire Writer Plato places the forms at the highest level of his schema of reality and imitations (certain poetry and other artwork) at the bottom. He places human representations of the forms – such as the â€Å"couchmaker’s† fabrication of a couch – somewhere between the forms and imitative art forms. This couch is loosely based on the form of couch and according to Plato is more permissible than imitative art forms. Although the â€Å"couchmaker’s† fabrication of a couch is more truthful than a painter’s representation of the same couch, Plato still condemns it for being deceitful: â€Å" o that they look like they are; however, they surely are not the truth. † Plato feels that because of the rising popularity of imitative art forms within the city, and the skilful representations of craftsmen, people will be misled by the metaphorical mirror that reflects what is real. By deceiving people like this, Plato believes that this imitative poet ry will corrupt the souls of people and therefore should be banned from the city. Along with holding far less truth than the forms, imitative artwork also has negative moral and psychological implications, according to Plato. To accentuate this, Plato divides the soul into three different areas of importance. The base level – in which he calls ‘the appetite’ of the soul and allocates the least amount of importance to – is driven by urges and sins and is easy to deceive and manipulate. The second level, the will, is the power to control one’s own actions, but can also be influenced. The first and most important level is the intellect or reason; this level drives the other two parts of the soul and, when exercised and mastered, can distinguish truth from imitation. Plato claims that imitative art forms seem to target the base level (appetite) of the soul because it is the easiest to deceive and people give in to a sensationalist imitation rather than the truth. â€Å"The imitative poet produces a bad regime in the soul of each private man by making phantoms that are far removed from the truth and by gratifying the soul’s foolish part † Mimesis weakens the first and second levels of the soul by appealing to the base level’s pleasure-seeking ways. According to Plato, imitative art forms are representations of the forms; mere renderings of the truth. Imitative art forms deceive people into believing things that are not the truth. Imitative art forms harm the part of the soul that distinguishes truth from imitation. To harm this part of the soul is to harm truth and reason. The city is just and follows laws that reflect the truth. Therefore, imitative art forms such as most poetry should be banned from the city. * Plato says X, Aristotle says Y, Plato points to the heavens (forms, universals), Aristotle points to the ground (physical objects, particulars) [Raphael’s School of Athens]. Both philosophers disagreed often and it is no surprise that Aristotle’s thoughts on mimesis are an implicit repudiation of Plato’s thoughts on mimesis. In Aristotle’s Poetics he splits mimesis into three varieties: the media, the objects and the mode of mimesis. He does this to help build upon his argument that art and mimesis have importance to a society and actually have striking similarities to philosophy. The media of mimesis is explained as the dissimilarities in â€Å"rhythm, speech, and harmony† that authors and poets can use to get their respective messages across. Aristotle points out that many people – scientists and poets – who write in verse, can be called makers of mimesis and that each â€Å"maker† uses a different media of mimesis. â€Å" they think no doubt, that ‘makers’ is applied to poets not because they make mimesis, but as a general term meaning ‘verse-makers’, since they call ‘poets’ or ‘makers’ even those who publish a medical or scientific theory in verse. † Here Aristotle is attempting associate mimesis to more than the arts by referring to mimesis not simply as imitation, but as similar to making. He is placing a high importance on ‘verse-making’ by showing that a particular rhythm and speech pattern is the only difference between artists and scientists in regard to the way they present their respective works. The objects of mimesis, Aristotle claims â€Å"are people doing things, and these people must necessarily be either good or bad. † Aristotle goes on to say that within representations, people can be portrayed as good or bad (‘better’ or ‘worse’) by artists and we will be able to distinguish this property of goodness or badness through use of mediums such as tragedy and comedy. The mode of mimesis is a way of representing objects in the same media to which Aristotle believes can be done in three ways: â€Å" in narration and sometimes becoming someone else; or speaking in one’s own person without change, or with all the people engaged in the mimesis actually doing things. † These are simply parts of speech an author might use to get her message across about the object, showing it to be good or bad. Aristotle then begins to examine what he believes are the overall causes of poetry. Aristotle states that mimesis is innate in people, when we are born we mimic things and we learn through this mimicry. We understand things we wouldn’t otherwise enjoy seeing in person (re: example of the corpse). The picture of the corpse will â€Å"not produce its pleasure qua instance of mimesis, but because of its technical finish or colour or for some other such reason. † This is to say that we can appreciate the picture of the corpse not due to the fact that it is a corpse (we know it is not a real corpse) but because of the artistic style and or talent of the artist. Aristotle then lays out the foundation for a good tragedy that is to say a tragedy that emits emotion to the people watching or reading it. By invoking emotions through tragedy, people can learn something about themselves and their family and perhaps something even deeper. Aristotle claims that a good tragedy will produce catharsis onto the people watching it. Catharsis is a bi-divisional schema according to Aristotle; it can cleanse people of negative emotions through fear and sadness (dispelling your own fear by watching something scary), or educate or clarify something that one may be struggling with (showing us that road rage can lead to general rage). According to Aristotle, mimesis is innate in human nature and provides us with learning methods. Through tragedies, comedies, poetry and other imitative art forms, we can learn much about ourselves and the world. Learning and education are important to a society and help the development of young minds. Therefore mimesis is good and should be kept in society. * As with much of their respective philosophies, Plato and Aristotle disagree upon the notion of mimesis in their aesthetic approaches. Plato viewed mimesis as harmful to the best parts of the soul, and thought it tricked people into believing more fantastical things and ignoring the truth. Aristotle believed that mimesis – and the catharsis it created – fostered growth and prosperity. Works Cited Cooper E. David [Ed. ]. Aesthetics: The Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1997. Print. Plato, The Republic, Book 10, pp 11-28, Aristotle, Poetics, pp 29-44. [ 1 ]. Cooper E. David [Ed. ]. Aesthetics: The Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1997. *Plato. [ 2 ]. Ibid [ 3 ]. Ibid [ 4 ]. Cooper E. David [Ed. ]. Aesthetics: The Classic Readings. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 1997. *Aristotle. [ 5 ]. Ibid [ 6 ]. Ibid [ 7 ]. Ibid [ 8 ]. Ibid

Sunday, March 15, 2020

Free Essays on Lost Generation

Lost Generation A group of U.S. writers who came of age during World War I and established their reputations in the 1920s; are called the â€Å"Lost Generation Writers†. The term was coined by Gertrude Stein in a remark to Ernest Hemingway. The writers considered themselves "lost" because their inherited values could not operate in the postwar world and they felt spiritually alienated from a country they considered hopelessly average and emotionally lacking. The term embraces Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Dos Passos, E.E. Cummings, Archibald MacLeish, and Hart Crane, among others. I found Ernest Hemingway writing fascinating. Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Ill., he began work as a journalist after high school. He was wounded while serving as an ambulance driver in World War I. He later became part of a famous group of expatriate writers in Paris, and soon embarked on a life of travel, skiing, fishing, and hunting that would be reflected in his work. His story collection, In Our Time, 1925 was followed by the novel The Sun Also Rises 1926. Later novels included A Farewell to Arms 1929 and To Have and Have Not 1937. His lifelong love for Spain including a fascination with bullfighting led to his working as a correspondent during the Spanish Civil War, which resulted in the novel For Whom the Bell Tolls 1940. Other short-story collections include Men Without Women 1927, Winner Take Nothing 1933, and The Fifth Column 1938. He lived primarily in Cuba from 1940, the locale of his novella, The Old Man and the Sea 1952, which won him a Pulitzer Prize. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954. He left Cuba s hortly after its 1959 revolution; a year later, depressed and ill, he shot himself. The succinct and concentrated prose style of his early works strongly influenced many British and American writers for decades. The specific novel I read by him was The Old Man & The Sea it was a fascinating novel. Everything about The Ol... Free Essays on Lost Generation Free Essays on Lost Generation Lost Generation A group of U.S. writers who came of age during World War I and established their reputations in the 1920s; are called the â€Å"Lost Generation Writers†. The term was coined by Gertrude Stein in a remark to Ernest Hemingway. The writers considered themselves "lost" because their inherited values could not operate in the postwar world and they felt spiritually alienated from a country they considered hopelessly average and emotionally lacking. The term embraces Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, John Dos Passos, E.E. Cummings, Archibald MacLeish, and Hart Crane, among others. I found Ernest Hemingway writing fascinating. Ernest Hemingway was born in Oak Park, Ill., he began work as a journalist after high school. He was wounded while serving as an ambulance driver in World War I. He later became part of a famous group of expatriate writers in Paris, and soon embarked on a life of travel, skiing, fishing, and hunting that would be reflected in his work. His story collection, In Our Time, 1925 was followed by the novel The Sun Also Rises 1926. Later novels included A Farewell to Arms 1929 and To Have and Have Not 1937. His lifelong love for Spain including a fascination with bullfighting led to his working as a correspondent during the Spanish Civil War, which resulted in the novel For Whom the Bell Tolls 1940. Other short-story collections include Men Without Women 1927, Winner Take Nothing 1933, and The Fifth Column 1938. He lived primarily in Cuba from 1940, the locale of his novella, The Old Man and the Sea 1952, which won him a Pulitzer Prize. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1954. He left Cuba s hortly after its 1959 revolution; a year later, depressed and ill, he shot himself. The succinct and concentrated prose style of his early works strongly influenced many British and American writers for decades. The specific novel I read by him was The Old Man & The Sea it was a fascinating novel. Everything about The Ol...

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Amazon Inc Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words

Amazon Inc - Research Paper Example In its recent endeavors, the company has been performing as a proven technology leader and has developed e-commerce innovations such as personalized shopping services, I-click ordering easy-to-use and other browse features. The company offers faster and safer credit transaction facility to its customers, and e4-mail communication with customers and direct shopping at competitive price worldwide (Amazon.com, Inc., 1998). The primary purpose of this paper is to identify Amazon’s current and future challenges along with the requisite competencies needed for its success. Current and Future Challenges Amazon has been successful in satisfying its customers’ needs with lower prices, vast selection and speedy delivery facilities. Nevertheless, the company has been currently facing intense competition from other online book merchants, mainly due to ease in new entry and low level of switching costs in the industry. Furthermore, the challenges in the form of competition are expec ted to increase in the future, making it more challenging for Amazon to achieve its goals and objectives. Notably, the security and privacy issues have always been a matter for challenge for the online business companies like Amazon. Despite, the adequate level of security and other facilities provided by the company, many customers decipher reluctance for conducting transactions over the internet. Additionally, the rapidly changing e-commerce environment has offered the company to make constant changes in its strategies in order to grow and adapt to the changing environment. Along with these challenges, the poor logistics and supply chain management has radically affected the ability of the company to earn substantial profits (Singh & Waddell, 2004; University of Washington, 1998). Competencies Required For Success Over the years, the company has been able to meet the needs of its customers more effectively and efficiently, which has rewarded the company to establish itself as one of the world’s largest online retailers. However, the constant changes in the online business environment, along with increasing competition has urged the company to focus on certain specific factors to strengthen its core competencies in order to retain its market position and attain success in the future. Hence, it can be argued that market orientation is a crucial factor for modern management in the e-commerce sector. It is also essential for Amazon to target the relevant needs of the targeted customers rather than emphasizing solely on the advancement of its technology approach. It is also equally important for the company to capture the arising market opportunities after assessing the upcoming risks in an efficient manner. In this regard, it is suggestible that the goals and strategies framed by the company should be in consistent with SMART (i.e. Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Reliable and Timely). It is thus necessary for the company to establish effective planning, monitoring and controlling of its activities. Furthermore, the company should conduct market analysis as well as competitors’ analysis at regular intervals in order to acquire potential understanding about the prevailing market trends and competitors strategies. The company should also involve in developing leaders for future and ensuring greater success with increased competencies of the future leader to deal with the challenges in the most efficient manner. Nonetheless,